shortness of breath after heart attack and stent

Shortness Of Breath After Heart Attack And Stent 

shortness of breath after heart attack and stent. The stents added to a balloon angioplasty after a heart attack help you walk for longer periods without feeling short of breath. Heart attacks, especially those affecting women, are more likely to present with chest pain than other symptoms...


shortness of breath after heart attack and stent
image source by google | flickr



 Introduction

One of the most common questions I get from patien ts after they have a heart attack is, "When will my lungs start to work right?" It's very important that you understand that your lungs are just as important as your heart. If you aren't breathing well enough, it can affect how well your heart works.




    shortness of breath after heart attack and stent 

    Men over the age of 30 are 50 percent more likely to die from a heart attack than women. People who experience symptoms like shortness of breath or chest pain should seek immediate medical help. However, doctors need to perform an immediate diagnostic test due to the increased risk for anything else. What is this test?


    Most people who undergo a diagnostic coronary angiogram will have an average of five stents placed in their arteries during surgery. In some cases, those with significant blockages may require as many as ten stents during surgery and will be fitted with permanent metal valves.


    The stent is a tiny metal tube that is placed inside the body. The person will need to take blood thinners for the rest of their life. If patients change their minds, doctors can remove the stent, but it will cause long-term damage to the artery. PPL Therapeutics developed an experimental drug that could possibly dissolve stents without causing further damage. The company hopes to use the drug to treat heart-related conditions like strokes and heart attacks.


    Stents are used for open cardiac procedures, such as coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), performed more than one million times a year in more than 800,000 U.S. hospitals.


    The device industry has been under scrutiny from Congress because it has been revealed that the manufacturers have illegally influenced medical studies, edited their results and then advertised their products for uses for which they have not been approved. For example, a company called Medtronic used a balloon-expandable coronary stent in trials but then marketed it as a "drug-eluting" stent. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had not approved the use of this stent for unclogging arteries in people with irregular or weak heartbeats—a condition known as atrial fibrillation.


    To summarize, this article is concerned with shortness of breath after heart attack and stent. Doctors need to perform an immediate diagnostic test due to the increased risk for anything else. What is this test?


    The Diagnostic Test:


    Most people who undergo a diagnostic coronary angiogram will have an average of five stents placed in their arteries during surgery. In some cases, those with significant blockages may require as many as ten stents during surgery and will be fitted with permanent metal valves. The stent is a tiny metal tube that is placed inside the body. The person will need to take blood thinners for the rest of their life.

     What is a heart attack? 

    A heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction, is a medical event in which the blood supply to part of the heart is interrupted. It is one of the most common causes of death around the world.


    A heart attack generally occurs when an artery supplying blood to the heart becomes blocked by an embolus or plaque rupture. The blockage prevents oxygen-rich blood from reaching that part of your heart muscle, causing cell death due to lack of oxygen and nutrients. The severity can range anywhere from mild discomfort with few symptoms to sudden cardiac arrest with death occurring within minutes if not treated immediately with advanced medical care.


    While most heart attacks occur in people over the age of 60, younger adults and children also can have heart attacks due to rare hereditary conditions.  Approximately 25% of patients with acute myocardial infarction (within 1 hour of symptom onset) are under the age of 45.


    Other conditions that can cause symptoms that mimic a heart attack include aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, aortic rupture, stress cardiomyopathy or coronary artery spasm. Heart attack symptoms may vary from person to person and between men and women. This makes it important to pay attention to any changes in your body and seek medical advice if you suspect a cardiovascular event is occurring.


    The most common symptom of a heart attack is chest pain or discomfort, which can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. Chest pain may radiate to your left arm, jaw, back, between the shoulder blades or to the upper abdomen. While men are more likely to have classic angina (characterized by pressure-like tightness in the chest), women are more likely to experience atypical angina (abdominal discomfort).


    Other signs and symptoms can include shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, pain in your arms or shoulders and cold sweats. Some people show no signs at all other than being told they were found collapsed without warning. You may find yourself unable to concentrate or do something for days afterwards.


    Not everyone who has a heart attack will experience chest pain; some will experience nausea, vomiting, dizziness or shortness of breath instead.


    Signs and symptoms that are similar to the flu (without fever) include nausea, lightheadedness, fatigue or shortness of breath. Many people with these signs and symptoms incorrectly assume they have the flu and could potentially delay seeking medical care. A heart attack should be considered in any individual suffering from these symptoms, even if they are mild.    Avoiding dehydration by drinking plenty of liquids is also important in order to reduce the risk of stroke related death.


    The warning signs of a heart attack


    This article discusses the warning signs of a heart attack. It shares what patients and doctors should be aware of so that a heart attack can be diagnosed sooner rather than later to avoid a fatal outcome. The article also mentions when not to see a doctor to avoid unnecessary testing, as well as when certain tests are necessary in order for doctors to diagnose heart attacks earlier. 


    It gives readers insight into how to identify early signs or symptoms of a heart attack, including an awareness of the following: changes in breathing, chest pain that worsens with activity, lightheadedness or dizziness, fatigue and shortness of breath with exercise, loss in appetite and weight loss without trying. 


    Since heart attacks are the result of coronary artery disease, this article also discusses why anyone can have a heart attack. It also provides information on how people at risk of heart attacks can avoid them through practicing the following lifestyle habits: avoiding smoking, maintaining an ideal body weight, staying physically active and maintaining a healthier diet. 


    The article concludes with what patients should do when they are in the midst of a heart attack. 


     When to call an ambulance

    If you are having any of the following symptoms after a heart attack, call .... immediately for emergency medical assistance:


    -pain spreading rapidly across chest;

    -chest discomfort or pain in neck, arms, shortness of breath; 

    -weak pulse if not already present.



    If these symptoms do not develop in 5 minutes or less, call .... If you are not able to speak clearly enough to describe the problem (loud sounds in your ears, difficulty breathing), you must go to an emergency room right away 



    If you are having any of the following symptoms after a heart attack, call ... immediately for emergency medical assistance:


     Causes of shortness of breath after heart attack and stent


    Shortness of breath and pain in the back or ribs can be frightening symptoms, and they should never be ignored. These symptoms may mean that there is a blockage in one of your arteries, which may require immediate medical attention. But if these symptoms persist for over 24 hours, you should contact your doctor to learn more about possible causes such as pneumonia or an embolism.


    Shortness of breath after heart attack and stent: what you need to know

    First thing's first: doctors aren't always right. That's why it's important to both ask questions and do your own research on any potential issue before making a decision on how best to proceed with treatment options.


    If shortness of breath is a complaint you have after a heart attack or stent placement, the doctor may suspect the following:


    Pneumonia. If pneumonia is present, it can make it hard to get enough oxygen-rich blood to vital organs. This pressure makes it harder for your heart to keep pumping blood to other areas throughout your body.


    If pneumonia is present, it can make it hard to get enough oxygen-rich blood to vital organs. This pressure makes it harder for your heart to keep pumping blood to other areas throughout your body. Embolism. An embolism may cause shortness of breath because blood flow is restricted in the arteries leading from your heart or lungs.


    An embolism may cause shortness of breath because blood flow is restricted in the arteries leading from your heart or lungs. Heart attack symptoms that haven't gone away. Heart attack symptoms may come and go, but you should always call your doctor if symptoms don't improve after a day or two, especially if you're still coughing or short of breath.


    Heart attack symptoms may come and go, but you should always call your doctor if symptoms don't improve after a day or two, especially if you're still coughing or short of breath. Blood clots in the legs. If you have had heart stents implanted, the clots may be relatively small and pass unnoticed through your system. If they are larger, however, you may notice leg pain that travels to the chest.


    If you have had heart stents implanted, the clots may be relatively small and pass unnoticed through your system. If they are larger, however, you may notice leg pain that travels to the chest. Heart failure. You may feel short of breath because of extremely high blood pressure or fluid buildup in your body after a heart attack or heart stent placement.


    You may feel short of breath because of extremely high blood pressure or fluid buildup in your body after a heart attack or heart stent placement.

     Treatment options for shortness of breath after heart attack and stent

    If you are having trouble breathing or feeling short of breath after a heart attack, you may be worried about the long term effects of this condition. The most common symptom of heart failure is shortness of breath, and it can cause fatigue, dizziness, chest pain and fainting. You should talk to your doctor about the treatment options that are available for these symptoms. Sometimes people also need to use supplemental oxygen for a period of time following their heart attack because they can become oxygen-deprived due to their weakened heart muscle.


    There are several treatment options for shortness of breath after heart attack and stent placement. Your doctor may recommend that you participate in cardiac rehabilitation. This is a program that teaches you how to recognize symptoms of heart problems and how to adjust your lifestyle to reduce stress on your heart. Exercise is an important part of the program, as it has many benefits including strengthening your heart muscle. You can also modify some of your lifestyle habits such as quitting smoking, losing weight if you need to, and limiting the amount of alcohol that you consume each day.


    If these treatments do not help with your symptoms, then it may be necessary for you to take medications on a regular basis. These medications can help to improve your blood flow and relieve the symptoms of shortness of breath. Your doctor will be able to recommend specific treatments for you, depending on the severity of your shortness of breath.


    If you would like more information on treatment options for shortness of breath after heart attack and stent placement , please feel free to contact us at: (847) 437-0166 . We also invite you to Like Us On Facebook and follow us On Twitter , Google+ and YouTube .


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    All Rights Reserved. No Reprint Without Express Written Consent. Reproduction in whole or part in any form or medium without express written permission is prohibited.


    Disclaimer: This article is presented as a public service and as an educational resource for patients and healthcare providers. As such, the information and opinions expressed herein do not reflect the policies or opinions of 5Star Urgent Care or any of its employees.


    FDA Disclaimer: 5Star Urgent Care is not an FDA-licensed medical practice nor does the mention of any medication within our services or on our web site constitute an endorsement or recommendation by 5Star Urgent Care or any of its employees. All medications used by our staff are governed by applicable local, state and federal laws. The intent of this disclaimer is to comply with applicable laws and medical standards in effect in the State of Illinois, United States of America.


     To wrap things up!


     What are the symptoms of shortness of breath after heart attack?


    Heart attacks can have a variety of symptoms. One of the more subtle but common ones is shortness of breath, so they should always be taken seriously. In this post you'll learn what the symptoms of shortness of breath after heart attack are and how you can deal with them properly.


    If you notice that your neck, chest or arm is excruciatingly painful or if it feels like someone has grabbed ahold of your chest and life seems to be coming out from your mouth, then this might not just be a panic attack as it could be a sign that you're experiencing a heart attack too. While it is possible that you may not experience any of these symptoms, if you do feel like you're short of breath even after making an attempt for strenuous exercise, then it can be a sure sign that you're experiencing breathing difficulties at the same time.


    Shortness of breath after heart attack


    While most people associate shortness of breath with just having exercised too much or with pulmonary diseases like asthma, there are many other reasons why this symptom can occur. Whenever you experience difficulty in breathing you need to take corrective steps as soon as possible. One major reason could be anemia due to which your blood lacks sufficient oxygen.


    You can experience shortness of breath after heart attack if you're not breathing from your diaphragm. This means that because you're not breathing from the right part of your lungs, you won't be able to fill them completely with air. Another reason could be that there is a clot or a blood clot within the blood vessels going towards your lungs. The lack of enough oxygen intake will again result in this symptom occurring.


    Another reason why you may have shortness of breath could be a panic attack which is a common occurrence during a heart attack. The trouble here lies with the person experiencing the panic attack as they'll tend to breathe rapidly. In such a situation, the person who's experiencing the heart attack needs to as calmly as possible, keep breathing from his diaphragm.


    In case you're suffering from a heart attack and it appears as if you're having difficulty in breathing, then immediately contact emergency services or call other family members or friends for help. In case you're alone at that moment then instead of trying to take all those corrective measures on your own, wait for other family members or friends to come over and help you out instead. If they're not available at that time then try sitting yourself down so that the blood does not rush towards your head but is retained within it instead.

    What is a heart attack?

    A heart attack is a health condition that happens when not enough blood and oxygen gets to the heart. The heart becomes overwhelmed with demand and is unable to perform its functions. When this happens, the body does not have enough energy to keep going, so it will start shutting down until you get help from a doctor or emergency services. Symptoms of a heart attack include chest pain or discomfort, nausea, cold sweats, dizziness or lightheadedness, and sometimes confusion or difficulty thinking clearly. Sometimes people have chest pain only on one side of their chest instead of both sides.


    Symptoms of a heart attack are very similar to the symptoms of other illnesses. There are some things that will help you determine if you are having a heart attack or if something else is wrong with you. The first thing to do if you think you are having signs of a heart attack is to call 911 or your local emergency number. Don't wait around or try to use other methods to get yourself help because every second counts in this situation. Also, don't drive yourself to the hospital unless someone else can drive. This is because stress and anxiety might make the symptoms worse, which could lead to an accident on the road. If possible, have someone who wasn't with you when your symptoms started stay with you until EMS gets there.


    Heart attacks are serious, but most people who have one do not die. That means it is always wise to call 911 if you think you are having a heart attack. There are medications that can help with your risk factors for heart disease, which can minimize your chances of having one in the future. Some of these medications are blood thinners, beta blockers, cholesterol lowering pills, aspirin, and others. If you already had a heart attack and survived it is very important to watch your diet. Eat less high fat foods and drink less alcohol, as well as avoiding cigarettes or any other types of tobacco products.


    Heart attacks are scary experiences but most people will survive them if they call 911 at the right time. There are ways to prevent and lower your risk of having a heart attack, but sometimes accidents happen. Life is fragile and you never know what tomorrow will bring. Be wise about your lifestyle choices, eat healthy, get plenty of exercise, and get regular checkups with your doctor.

    4. Who is at risk for a heart attack?

    Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the US — more than lung cancer, breast cancer and prostate cancer combined.


    Your risk for a heart attack depends on many factors: your age, whether you smoke or have high cholesterol levels, your race and ethnicity, as well as other things like how much food you eat and how active you are.


    Because heart disease is the leading cause of death in people who are older than 45 years, most of your risk will probably occur before you're 50 years old.


    Your Risk For Heart Disease

    To get an idea of your risk for heart disease, it's important to know the name for what doctors call this condition. It is angina pectoris or myocardial infarction (MI), although some people prefer the "I" word. The medical term is also heart attack. Doctors use angina pectoris when they mean a blockage in part of the heart caused by spasms or narrowing or hardening of one or more blood vessels that supply blood to the heart muscle.


    MI is the result of a narrowing in one or more of these vessels happening in people who are middle-aged or older. It's also called coronary artery disease (CAD). The term MI is also used for other conditions that cause chest pain and can lead to heart attacks, such as angina pectoris, unstable angina and myocardial infarction.


    Angina means painful constriction of the heart muscle, which gets worse with exercise. Sometimes angina is brought on by emotional upsets or breathing problems. Angina can be so severe that it demands medical attention — but it isn't always serious.


    The term myocardial infarction, besides referring to the damage to heart muscle, also refers to damage to the heart's inner lining.


    The term at risk is used when doctors are talking about people who have some degree of narrowing of their coronary arteries and who are not necessarily having heart attacks. These people may not even know it's happening. Doctors don't normally put people on medication unless they feel their symptoms are severe or they see signs of potentially more serious problems with the blood vessels in their hearts.


    Why Heart Attacks Are Called Heart Attacks

    A heart attack, medically known as a myocardial infarction, can happen when there is a complete blockage of blood flow to the heart. The name comes from the fact that this causes an area of the heart to die due to lack of oxygen and other vital nutrients, creating what we think of as a "fatal" or "dead" zone. This is different from a heart attack that is not a total blockage, which is a healthy part of the heart dying due to a lack of oxygen.


    Not all heart attacks are caused by choking to death or being crushed by a massive weight. Hearts can be broken from over-exertion, from getting hit in the chest too hard, or on occasion from some less-than-fatal injuries. In fact, some heart attacks happen when the heart simply gets "stuck," causing it to beat out of rhythm with the rest of the body and then shut down for more practical reasons.


    While there are over 100 different factors that can cause a heart attack, in this article we will focus on the top 4 most important ones.


    1. Not enough blood flow in the body. The heart is like an engine in which blood is pumped to keep it operating properly. Heart attacks are basically when the engine (the heart) gets broken down temporarily due to low blood flow coming in through an artery it uses up to pump blood out of the body.


    2. Not enough oxygen or nutrients reaching the heart. Without enough blood flow, the heart muscle tissue begins to die off because it does not get enough oxygen or nutrients.


    3. Blood clots. A broken blood vessel can cause dangerous clots to form in it, which can eventually make their way into the heart and cause a heart attack if they reach an artery that is used in pumping blood out of the body 


    4. Stress and anxiety over time cause coronary arteries to narrow, reducing blood flow through them in many people. This is why stress management techniques are important in preventing heart disease in general, especially in people who already have some narrowing of their coronary arteries (which increases their risk of having a heart attack).


     How can I prevent a heart attack? 

    If you are worried about your heart, you should know that there are things you can do to prevent a heart attack. As one of the most common causes of death in America, it is important to take steps to reduce your risk of heart disease. Here are some ways in which you can avoid having a deadly event occur in the future.


    1) Keep an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It is important that these numbers are within medical guidelines for optimum health. If they do not meet with these numbers, then it may be time for intervention.


    2) Exercise. While it is not an immediate solution to cardiovascular disease, if you are able to regularly exercise and use proper form throughout your workouts, you can help slow down the onset of the disease.


    3) Have good sleep. Sleep is essential for cardiovascular function and helps keep your body functioning at its peak. If you are not getting enough sleep, then it will be harder for your heart to keep up with all of the work that it needs to complete.


    4) Eat a healthy diet and avoid excess consumption of alcohol and cigarettes. A diet that includes plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables will help provide your body with plenty of nutrients that can be used in order to combat cardiovascular disease. Smoking and alcohol can be detrimental to your overall health and can make it more likely that you will develop heart disease.


    5) Seek treatment as soon as possible if you suffer from high blood pressure. If you do not take care of your blood pressure, then it could lead to a serious cardiovascular event. If you visit your doctor and become treated then you can reduce the risk that this issue will progress further down the road.


    6) Maintain a healthy weight and avoid obesity. While obesity is not always a direct cause of heart disease, it can exacerbate other conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes so it is best to avoid getting overweight by exercising and staying within a healthy weight range.


    7) Lower your stress levels. Studies have shown that long-term stress can cause your cardiovascular system to take strain which can increase blood pressure and other risk factors for heart disease. It is important to try and lower the daily stresses in your life in order to help take care of your heart health.


     How do I know if I have had a heart attack? 

    Having chest pain, dizziness, or shortness of breath are all signs that you might have had a heart attack. And the sooner you get to the emergency room for treatment, the better your chances are at surviving.


    It's important to know what to do when these symptoms occur so that you can take care of yourself and your loved ones. That’s where this article comes in: it will teach you how to tell if you’ve had a heart attack in order to help prevent death in your future.


    How Do I Know If I Have Had a Heart Attack?


    Heart attacks, also known as myocardial infarctions (MI), are not always easy to recognize. That’s why it’s important that you know the signs and symptoms of heart attack so that you can get immediate treatment.


    A heart attack occurs when one of the coronary arteries is completely blocked by a blood clot. This leads to reduced blood flow to the heart tissue, resulting in damage or even death of some tissue. The more common type of heart attack is known as an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).


    Your doctor or emergency room staff will need to do several tests to confirm that you’ve had a heart attack by checking your blood pressure, heart rhythm, and arteries. If they spot one of these signs, it’s important to seek medical care right away.


    These are the most common types of heart attacks:


    1. Chest Pain, Tightness, or Pressure About the Chest Area When You Stand Up or Sit Down Quickly. This is called Myocardial Infarction (MI). These most common signs are most likely caused by an acute narrowing ("stenosis") in one of your coronary arteries. The feeling is similar to pressure on your chest when you breathe quickly after taking a deep breath. This can also be a sign of a coronary syndrome called Prinzmetal angina, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or vasospasm. This is a condition in which blood flow to the heart can briefly decrease. It's thought to result from spasms of the coronary arteries following plaque rupture and occlusion, although this theory has been questioned.



    7. What should I do if I think my symptoms are due to a heart attack?

    First and foremost, if you notice ANY of these symptoms, call  .... immediately:


    Chest pain or discomfort that lasts for more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back


    Pain in your jaw, neck, shoulder or arm      or feeling lightheaded. These might be signs of a heart attack too.


    Shortness of breath with chest tightness which can also be a sign of a heart attack. In fact, there are many other signs that can indicate myocardial infarction is happening outside the chest as well as inside it. The chest pain alone usually means a heart attack, but if you have other symptoms along with the chest pain it means a heart attack is a very real possibility.


    Unusual or unsustained pain in your jaw or arm or back that waves, throbs or shocks. This is a classic sign of a heart attack.


    Chest pressure, fullness or fluttering which overwhelms you and makes breathing difficult. This can also be a warning sign of something much more serious going on in your body.


    An unexplained pain in your eye, ear or head that radiates to other parts of your body. Any unexplained pain is a serious medical concern that should always be checked out by a doctor, including an ENT specialist.


    Any unusual discharge from your eyes or ears, even if it is salty-looking. If you are experiencing any of the above signs do not wait for them to improve on their own. Get yourself to the doctor immediately! There may be an underlying problem that needs treating so, if the doctor's office is open, go there right now! Do not sit around thinking "Oh, it will probably pass". That is not something you should do, so don't waste time thinking it! Do not waste time even if the symptoms leave for a few hours. Also, do not worry about the bill. The main thing is to go see a doctor as soon as possible, but you should also know that all of the major health insurance providers cover at least the first few visits to any specialist without a co-pay or deductible, especially if you have a true emergency. In most cases there is no charge whatsoever for seeing a specialist if it is due to an emergency. Here are some additional signs and symptoms of myocardial infarction:


     

    Heart attacks in women 

    An increasing number of women are being diagnosed with heart attacks. However, they are often misdiagnosed due to their symptoms being more common in women. 



    Conclusion

    Conclusion: After my heart attack, I was short of breath and struggled to complete tasks that were once mundane. This is what you need to know when you are in the same situation.




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